Lalepé

Regulatory Considerations

 

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) are the main regulatory bodies restricting or allowing the use of various products on board especially at take-off, taxi and landing.  The two main test Lalepé would presumably have to pass are detailed below. 

 

Head Injury Criterion

JAR 25.562

Lalepé goes through a 16g dynamic forward sled test with and a check for the Head Injury Criteria. To pass Lalepé has to stay attached and not deform under the impact. 

As the child is rearward-facing and held by a 3-point harness on board, the HIC is likely to remain within the norm if applying the car seat analogy.

As the child is rearward-facing and held by a 3-point harness on board, the HIC is likely to remain within the norm if applying the car seat analogy.

Overturning

ECE-R 44

This test puts the system in a rotary mechanism with an age-appropriate dummy and monitors the effectiveness of the restraint system and the movement of the child's body.

As the child is fully strapped in (at the shoulders and the torso) only the extremities would move as the shell rotates. 

As the child is fully strapped in (at the shoulders and the torso) only the extremities would move as the shell rotates. 


16g Dynamic Sled Test

Lalepé goes through a 16g dynamic forward sled test. To pass Lalepé has to stay attached and not severely deform under the impact. For this purpose a Finite Element Analysis was performed on the shell to prove it poses no danger to the child. 

14g downward test

14g downward test

16g forward test

16g forward test

A load of 1600 N was applied in a static position to the ABS part. In both cases the stress is 17 times below the yield, which should be plenty to cover the dynamic nature of the test in terms of the safety factor. Largest stress as predicted will occur in the stress raisors (narrow parts, cut-outs, extremity bases) of Lalepé. 


Passenger HIC

The on-board position of Lalepé also aims to be the least dangerous for emergency evacuation and HIC of the passenger sitting opposite the carrier system. See below an adult's brace position including the 10 degree side yaw. This arrangement is safer that that of holding the children on the lap.

 
In this setup there is no collusion of heads, meaning increased HIC safety. 

In this setup there is no collusion of heads, meaning increased HIC safety. 

 

Even considering other brace position (where adult leans on the seat in front) is it much safer to have the infant away from the lap space. 

 
The drawing looks at the setup from outside the aircraft. Lalepé is next to the head of the passenger.

The drawing looks at the setup from outside the aircraft. Lalepé is next to the head of the passenger.